Armistice Day 1918

Today is the Centenary of the end of World War One. Last month Henry and I spent a day in the Imperial War Museum in London to see the porcelain poppies in remembrance of the fallen from that terrible war. The real flowers grew when the earth was thrown around due to massive bombings and became a symbol of the fallen soldiers. Earlier this year I wrote another post on WWI 

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppies

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppies

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppies

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppies

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppies

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppies

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppy

Imperial war museum in London Weeping Poppy

The ceramic poppies are shown in many different locations to commemorate World War One.

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI. Royal Airforce plane

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI.

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI.

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI.

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI. The guide tells us about the camouflage observation post

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI

Imperial war museum in London exhibition on WWI

There is a permanent exhibition with only authentic items from that war. The museum, a former hospital was inaugurated during the WWI which explains the many original war pieces on display.


Denmark was neutral during WWI, but about 6000 young Danish soldiers died in the war because they were forced by the Germans to take part in their side of the war. The southern part of Denmark where they lived was conquered by the Prussian army in 1864. Fortunately half of it we got back in 1920.

Courtesy to a_war_in_pictures on Instagram

Courtesy to a_war_in_pictures on Instagram

6 Comments »

  1. Henry is very pleased to hear me read your comments aloud. Henry is working on a post on Lancaster bombing machine that shot down close his relatives’ home in 1944. 586 Lancasters took part in the mission, 38 planes were shot down…..

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