Kew Gardens in London

Kew Gardens

Founded in 1848, the Key Gardens is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

King George III was more interested in gardens and Botanic issues than the American Revolutionary War. The London Key Gardens are old Royal gardens with the world’s largest samples of plants. It’s as much a place for scientific studies than it is a botanic garden.

Somewhere in the Kew Gardens

Somewhere in the Kew Gardens

A few weeks ago I spent most of a day on my own in these historic gardens, and I was lucky to be able to walk with a guide who had endless knowledge to share with the group.

Cherry trees

Cherry trees

It was a special experience to walk through different kind of greenhouses for the world’s many climates. One was so warm and damp that I couldn’t use my glasses and other ones had a pleasantly dry and temperate air.

The Palm House (1844-1848) designed by Decimus Burton

The Palm House (1844-1848) Decimus Burton

Inside the Palm House (1844-1848)

Inside the Palm House (1844-1848)

Waterlily House

Waterlily House, the hottest and most humid of the houses at Kew. It’s closed in winter months

Alpine House

Alpine House maximum temperature should not exceed 20 degrees Celsius

Plants from the Alpine House

Plants from the Alpine House

 

High up under the treetops you can walk on a hanging bridge and have a view over the restored Victorian greenhouse in architect style that would be lovely to see today.

View from the Treetop walkway which takes visitors 200 metres above the ground and the Temperate House

View from the Treetop walkway which takes visitors 200 metres above the ground and the Temperate House. Designed by Decimus Burton who also designed the Palm House

 

Temperate House

Temperate House

Temperate House opened 1863

Temperate House the largest Victorian glasshouse in the world

Temperate House

Temperate House

Temperate House

Temperate House

Temperate House

Temperate House

 

View from the station Kew Gardens

View from the station Kew Gardens

In a follow up to this post, I will show you a bench in Kew Gardens commemorating the WWI battle of Vernon.

The 50 minutes’ trip was easy to make from Central London via the Underground, and my only regret was that I miscalculated the weather and missed my cardigan under my cotton coat.

Categories: blogging, London

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12 Comments »

  1. A lovely post, Maria. I’ve heard about Kew Gardens.
    There’s a nagging thought in my head that one of the old explorers tried to recreate the gardens, maybe 150-200 years ago?

    Like

  2. These are spectacular photos you have taken I thank you. (Just a small thing Maria – It might be a problem with a translation but in your post you have written KEW sometimes and KEY other times. I think you mean KEW )

    Liked by 1 person

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