Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

If you want to find the bronze statue with the fairytale figure Peter Pan and his companions, you have to look urgently and determined in the Kensington Gardens. It’s one of the four Royal Parks in London in a long line through the centre of the city. I have noticed to look for it at the Italian Gardens in the park to be able to find it on a winding path along a lake called The Long Water.

Peter Pan statue in Kensington Garden

Peter Pan statue in Kensington Garden by George Frampton

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan surrounded by squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies.

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan surrounded by squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies.

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan surrounded by squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies.

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan surrounded by squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies.

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan surrounded by squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies.

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan surrounded by squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies.

Kensington Garden’s famous fictional resident, the bronze statue features Peter Pan surrounded by squirrels, rabbits, mice and fairies.

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Detail from the Peter Pan statue in Kensington Garden by George Frampton

Detail from the Peter Pan statue in Kensington Gardens

Detail from the Peter Pan statue in Kensington Garden by George Frampton

Detail of Kensington Garden’s bronze statue of Peter Pan

Detail of Kensington Garden’s bronze statue of Peter Pan

Detail of Kensington Garden’s bronze statue of Peter Pan

Detail of Kensington Garden’s bronze statue of Peter Pan

The last few years the children group statue has undergone renovation. One of the reasons for the restoration was to make it more visible and accessible. My pictures are from before that time. In March 2020, I will return to see how it looks now.

I once bought the famous children’s book by JM Barrie in London, but I admit that it’s difficult to read for a foreigner like me. The children who had the story read to them more than a hundred years ago were bright to understand the elaborate language.

The Victorian-style of the sculptor Sir George Frampton reminds me of a time where things were supposed to be beautiful to look at. It was placed in the spot in 1912 from before everything changed after WWI.

Categories: blogging

8 Comments »

  1. How cute. I guess the main fairy is Tinkerbell. And the mature lady would be Mrs Darling. It’s a book I read as a child, and I’d have to read it again to remind myself of the language. But, for sure, English – like all languages – has changed dramatically in formality and structure. My problem as writer is that I read so much as child that I still tend to use tooooo many words 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      • My personal opinion is that the coded messages is a myth propagated by people who see the text through the prism of their own lifestyles, or who have been influenced by movies that do not stick to the script. The drug taking of the 60s inspired some trippy thinking, such as Jefferson Airplane’s White Rabbit. If you repeat something often enough, people think it is true.
        I just think it was a fantasy story for young children. The hookah, for example, is something that Hodgson would have known was commonplace in the Arabic world.
        I cherish my illustrated copy my aunty gave me for my seventh birthday. It includes “Through the Looking Glass”.
        As for Peter Pan, my impression is (1) the struggle from childhood to accepting the responsibility of adulthood, and (2) Motherhood, or the loss of it.
        Enjoy!

        Liked by 1 person

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