More Iconic Buildings From Seattle

Should anybody be interested in why I went to Seattle this summer, please read here.

It is hard to grasp how it all looked from the start as the city was regraded over thirty years’ period ending in the 1930s. To get an idea about it, please have a look at the search images on the subject. Because of the significant increase of inhabitants, a colossal work was later done on regrading of Denny Hill.  You still have to climb many steps from the sea level to Western Avenue and First Avenue.

 

To find out more about it, you can take a guided tour at the two ground tours available at Pioneer Square. Hans Pederson has for sure had a part in this vast work. Unfortunately, we couldn’t trace any testimony about it during our week in Seattle.

The Rainier Club


 

The YMCA downtown Seattle building from 1930 situated opposite the Rainier Club on 4th Avenue and Columbia Street


 

Federal Office Building at the site where the great 1889 fire started

 

 

Red Building with white top. If any of you could identify the building that would be fine. Thank you to blogger Wedgwood in Seattle for your help in identifying this building:

 The red brick building with the “snowy” top (terra cotta) is meant to look like a snow-topped mountain. It is the old Federal Building, the same one which contains a post office and has a plaque on the front, at First & Madison Street, marking the place where the Great Seattle Fire of June 6, 1889, began. In your second photo of the old Federal Building, looking straight west, we see the new Federal Building at right — looking west from Second & Marion Street. 


 

Kings County Courthouse Paula Pederson’s father Hans Pederson was the contractor on this building from 1916 with added six floors in 1930

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Richardsonian Romanesque stone, red brick terra cotta and cast iron Pioneer Building at Pioneer Square. Completed in 1892 after the great fire in 1989. Designed by Elmer Fisher.

The Pioneer Building at Pioneer Square in the basement housing the Underground Tour

The Pioneer Building at Pioneer Square in the basement housing the Underground Tour


 

The Exchange Building in Art Deco style from 1930 at 2nd Avenue and Marion Street. The building is huge. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a picture of it. The Exchange is an architectural icon located in Seattle’s thriving downtown. Within walking distance from Pioneer Square, Pike’s Place Market.


 

Buildings at 2nd Avenue

We in Europe don’t have buildings like those above

We chose a hostel close to where my father’s uncle Valdemar had spent his adult life. Fortunately, the facade is preserved from the historic building first used as an indoor swimming pool and changed into the Evangelical church where Valdemar worked as a janitor until he died. I was pleased to find out that the building since 2015 is housing a museum on Jewish children who survived the Holocaust. Holocaust Center for Humanity

A collection of photos of the new and old building that used to be a swimming pool, an ice rink, a boxing centre and the Bethel Church where Valdemar, our Danish uncle lived and worked in the 1940’s -1964. Now a Holocaust Centre for surviving children.


Pike Place Market

 

 

4 Comments »

  1. I love the architecture and knowing that some of their past is being preserved. Your pictures have given me a rare glimpse of a city I most likely wouldn’t see otherwise. Thank you, Maria.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. So glad that you had good weather for your visit! The red brick building with the “snowy” top (terra cotta) is meant to look like a snow-topped mountain. It is the old Federal Building, the same one which contains a post office and has a plaque on the front, at First & Madison Street, marking the place where the Great Seattle Fire of June 6, 1889, began. In your second photo of the old Federal Building, looking straight west, we see the new Federal Building at right — looking west from Second & Marion Street.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am so glad that you tell me this. It’s nearly impossible to get it all right at once. I will correct the text on the computer later. We were indeed lucky with stable weather during that week in August

      Liked by 1 person

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